The Gods Must Be Crazy (1980)

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Sometimes you come across a film you should’ve heard of. For me it was The Gods Must Be Crazy from 1980. I’ll tell you straight out the gate it’s one hell of a goofball comedy with heaps of sweetness to boot. Can’t see how on Earth I missed it as it seems everyone I talk to has heard of it! What with 45 thousand ratings on IMDB bringing its score up to 7.3/10 this movie is much loved and has a devoted cult following. Quick read after watching it, I was surprised to see that it made a colossal amount of money with a worldwide take of around 100 million dollars! Making it one of the most commercially successful films to come out of South Africa.

Tagline – The critics are raving… the natives are restless… and the laughter is non-stop!

Continue reading “The Gods Must Be Crazy (1980)”

The Hit (1984) RIP John Hurt

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What a tremendous portrait picture

Such sad news to hear the passing of the wonderfully talented actor, the irreplaceable John Hurt. Just like anyone of my age, he just seemed to be there throughout my teenage years and beyond. Whether it was Max in Midnight Express, the voice of Hazel on Watership Down, the iconic scene in Alien as Kane with his chest bursting open, or his beautifully pained and sad performance as John Merrick in The Elephant Man. Add to that he showed us the bleak totalitarian future in George Orwell’s 1984. All these films have always been there, part of my growing up. Mr Hurt has done so many more incredible films but those are the ones closest to me. Continue reading “The Hit (1984) RIP John Hurt”

12:01 PM (1990)

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Groundhog Day meets The Twilight Zone in this head scratching time bouncing, loop de loop, flashback mystery. Poor Myron Castleman, played by Kurtwood Smith, is stuck living the same 59 minute loop on his lunch break. It’s quite the conundrum for the guy, who appears at the same place at 12.01pm no matter what he does. Can he break the pattern and solve the mystery before it drives him quite mad? Continue reading “12:01 PM (1990)”

David and Lisa (1962)

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Being totally bewitched by a beautiful young lady has put me on the path to many excellent films. She was like a siren calling me with her bewildering eyes to search her out, pointing me in the right direction to have my mind entertained by wonderful stories. That girl was Janet Margolin and I had first seen her tragic performance in the Marlon Brando flick Morituri. Searching for her other works I found this quirky love story David and Lisa by husband and wife team Frank and Eleanor Perry who lead me on to The Swimmer and a few other very interesting gems I can’t wait to watch. Continue reading “David and Lisa (1962)”

The Thing from Another World (1951)

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I had a nice surprise visit from my old friend Yohan the other day. Just popped on by for a catch up before heading off to one of the stars in the constellation of Orion. He’s a lovely guy but total germaphobe. Refuses point blank to take his spacesuit off. Luckily he has a small hole to sip cocktails through a straw but our conversation is awkward, just muffled sounds and consists mainly of smiles and thumbs up. Now I was just about to watch the classic 50’s science fiction film The Thing From Another World and he squeezed in next to me mumbling something along the lines of “those pesky carrot monsters are the bane of the galaxy”. Continue reading “The Thing from Another World (1951)”

Roger Corman Interview With Marc Maron

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Roger Corman and Vincent Price.

High concepts and low budgets. The King Of Kings, Lord of Lords of the B-Movie empire. From producing over 200 odd films and directing something like 50 movies Roger Corman is a God to independent film making. He is also credited to have given a helping hand to few novice “directors” in their early days. Four big ones at that, James Cameron, Martin Scorsese, Ron Howard and Francis Ford Coppola all learnt their craft in the deep end on Roger Corman projects. Continue reading “Roger Corman Interview With Marc Maron”

The White Buffalo (1977)

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“A deadly dream that was eating out his soul, a nightmare he had to hunt down and face up to before it turned him into a raving maniac!”

Now this was the train conductors opening words about our hero Wild Bill Hickok, played by action star Charles Bronson, who had arrived back in town in disguise under the name James Otis. Wearing a pair of cyberpunk style round shades* he sneaks off the train. Within seconds his cover is blown, he tries to keep up the charade but no one is having any of it. Continue reading “The White Buffalo (1977)”

Quest for Fire (1981)

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What the hell did I just watch? Well it did have Rae Dawn Chong from Commando in the buff and making cute noises, so it wasn’t at all bad.

I was recommended this by a friend at work who had seen it on it’s cinema release and still remembered it fondly. Checking the IMDB score, which is a very healthy 7.4, I just had to watch it.

Continue reading “Quest for Fire (1981)”

To Live And Die In LA (1985)

 

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I blooming loved this 80’s film from director William Friedkin. It’s a mighty strange film though, it has equal measures of cheese, art house cinema and tough no nonsense cop action. To be honest I nearly didn’t make it past the first scene, on the roof with the terrorist, man I nearly exploded my funny bone! it was so freaking ridiculous. Then there’s the whole guarding the President seemed totally out of context to the rest of the film when for the rest of the film they are smashing the streets looking more like LA cops. But I’m so glad I stayed with it as the mishmash of kooky styles made this film so very unique. Continue reading “To Live And Die In LA (1985)”

The House Of Small Cubes (2008)

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Yes the wolfman does have a soft and cuddly side. I just try not to channel it too much due to the fact the salty tears make the fur under my eyes all knotty. There was no escaping it from this little emotional gem though. In similar tone of getting old and looking back at those treasured memories that Pixar’s UP smashed us straight in the face with a water cannon. This beautiful short animated film is from Japan and written and directed by Kunio Kato and Kenya Hirata. Known originally as Tsumiki no ie. Continue reading “The House Of Small Cubes (2008)”