The Petrified Forest (1936) A Waitress, a Hobo and a Bank Robber Walk Into a Bar

The Petrified Forest (1936) Leslie Howard Bette Davis Humphrey Bogart movie poster

There I was sitting giggling to myself, waiting for this hilarious, frightened, petrified woodland to appear only to find out it was just a few rocks in the godforsaken desert. Of course I’m only having a laugh. I found The Petrified Forest a very intriguing title. I knew Humphrey Bogart had a standout role within the film but I wasn’t here this time for him. This viewing was for a certain actress called Bette Davis, which, sit down before I say this, I’d not seen any of her films! Please forgive me, I take myself off on a long walk as penance!

The Petrified Forest (1936) Leslie Howard wandering desert tumbleweed dusty road Continue reading “The Petrified Forest (1936) A Waitress, a Hobo and a Bank Robber Walk Into a Bar”

Advertisements

They Drive by Night (1940) The Magnificent Fabrini Brothers

They Drive By Night (1940) poster movie Raoul Walsh Bogie Raft Lupino

Humphrey Bogart is back again hitting my screen in the wolf lair as the quest to work through his films carries on. This time HB was in supporting role mode in this 1940’s movie called They Drive By Night . Top billing duties went to George Raft who, lets be honest, sounds more like Humphrey than Bogie himself in this. These two native New Yorkers make very believable brothers. Let’s meet the Fabrini Brothers. Continue reading “They Drive by Night (1940) The Magnificent Fabrini Brothers”

In a Lonely Place (1950) Angry Bogie’s Fury And An Alternative Ending

In a Lonely Place (1950) Humphrey Bogart Nicholas Ray movie poster one sheet

Before doing this blog I was blissfully unaware of Humphrey Bogart being bad! I’d only seen a handful of his movies and what with his legendary status following you around since whenever I can remember. Call me naive, I’d always thought he played good guys.  Well rogues or strong willed tough guys with a heart of gold or a cast iron moral code. Well I couldn’t have been more wrong! He was somewhat naughty in The Desperate Hours but I have to say I didn’t expect him to beat his despicable me part in The Treasure of the Sierra Madre. So you see I wasn’t ready for Dixon Steele to turn up in In a Lonely Place and not reading anything about it when going in I’d expected him to be another Samuel Spade style PI. Continue reading “In a Lonely Place (1950) Angry Bogie’s Fury And An Alternative Ending”

City That Never Sleeps (1953) Robot Man, Strippers, Magician And A City God!

City That Never Sleeps (1953) poster one sheeet noir gig young mala powers

Voice of Chicago – “The city at night. A million homes, three and a half million people, all different from one another. People lovin’, people hatin’, people stealin’, people prayin’..”

Opening with the voice of Chicago looking down on its citizens, you can kinda guess we’re not in traditional film noir setting. Well actually the underlying story couldn’t be anymore noir but this strange little film has managed to squeeze in a few cheeky little surprises. So what’s going on Wolfie? Continue reading “City That Never Sleeps (1953) Robot Man, Strippers, Magician And A City God!”

No Way Out (1950) Sidney Poitier In Spinal Tap Of Prejudice

No Way Out (1950) poster dvd bluray cover paul rand design sidney poitier

With enough N-Bombs to make Quentin Tarantino blush, No Way Out is one helluva tough watch that’s for sure. However it processes an important social message about racial prejudices and bigoted hatred.  This is the story of a young black man and his encounter with narrow-minded, blind, racial intolerance. Continue reading “No Way Out (1950) Sidney Poitier In Spinal Tap Of Prejudice”

The Desperate Hours (1955) Home Invasion With Humphrey Bogart

The Desperate Hours (1955) poster art work one sheet bogart march wyler

Looking back through my recent film posts it reveals that the 50’s has been making a mark on this here cine-wolf. Each movie find that I watch has brought its own new unique style. Like with many films from the 40’s and 50’s they just get the pacing spot on. A dash of surprising action, a shocking bit of violence and the right amount of dialogue. Expertly giving a good balance to realistic situations and character development. Whilst still always pushing and probing the boundaries, daring to see what they can get past the censors. And with doing so, they manage to draw you right into their created worlds. Yesterdays viewing schedule presented me with Humphrey Bogart’s penultimate film, The Desperate Hours. Continue reading “The Desperate Hours (1955) Home Invasion With Humphrey Bogart”

Kiss Me Deadly (1955) Panting Barefoot Panic Starts The Hammer

Kiss Me Deadly (1955) Robert Aldrich Ralph Meeker film noir poster

And there I was sitting in a world where Stacy Keach was the only Mike Hammer from the hands of crime novelist Mickey Spillane. Stacy’s Mike smashed his way though our 80’s television screens like a, well, Hammer. Stacy Keach was perfect for the part as the tough, gruff and brutally efficient, hard-boiled private investigator. I just didn’t know there was a whole gang of different Mike Hammer’s bringing justice throughout the ages. Kolchak The Night Stalker very own Darren McGavin played him in a 50’s series and in a universe defying paradox, creator Mickey Spillane actually plays his own “baby” in the 1963 film The Girl Hunters. (I need to see this) Continue reading “Kiss Me Deadly (1955) Panting Barefoot Panic Starts The Hammer”

Shield for Murder (1954) A Cops Descent Into Oblivion

Shield for Murder (1954) poster edmond o'brien john agar film noir rogue cop

How come the criminals, all the gangsters, fences, wiseguys all seem to be making bucks? Seeing all the crooks you put away getting released early and still making big money.  Racketeers that manage to slip through your fingers living the life of luxury from the proceeds of organized crime. It starts to get to Lieutenant Barney Nolan (Edmond O’Brien). 16 years on the force laying down the law on the streets, for what? a paltry pension and no savings!. He deserves more. He’s put his life on the line every single day seeking justice for these damn criminals, how is it fair? He dreams of a big house in the suburbs, all the mod cons, the whole shebang, with his beautiful, happy smiling girl, Patty Winters (Marla English) by his side. It would be a wonderful life, he’d have to use his badge to get it though but how far would he go?

Tagline – A wild trigger finger… a lust for big money… and a weak spot for fast blondes hurled him from the straight-and-narrow to a crooked one-way road!

Continue reading “Shield for Murder (1954) A Cops Descent Into Oblivion”

Blast of Silence (1961) The Hired Hate Of Harlem Hitman

Blast Of Silence (1961) Criterion Allen Baron Neo film noir drama hitman

Just as our anti-hero hitman emerges from the subway tunnel womb to the sound of that great gravelly voice of Hart To Harts Max (Lionel Stander) I knew this was going to hit that bell at the top of my Wolfie meter with a sledgehammer blow. Blast Of Silence smashed me square in the chest with two slugs of a blasting revolver.

Narrator – “Remembering out of the black silence, you were born in pain.”

Blast Of Silence (1961) Allen Baron Neo film noir drama smoking arrival train NY Continue reading “Blast of Silence (1961) The Hired Hate Of Harlem Hitman”

Murder by Contract (1958) Hitman Tells You A Stranger Kills A Stranger

Murder by Contract (1958) Movie poster Vince Edwards Irving Lerner

Hitman Claude – “Have you boys ever killed anyone?… Well?”

“I thought not.. It’s not easy, you know. You read in the paper about some wife doing away with her husband, child murderer, knifing in a tavern brawl… These are crimes of passion. Crazy people off their rocker.

Then there’s the tigger-happy hoodlum, the kid that kills a gas station attendant because he can’t open the cash register fast enough. That’s another type of crazy person. Both types eventually get caught. They don’t plan. They can’t. Even if they did, it’d be no use. The only type of killing that’s safe is when a stranger kills a stranger. No motive. Nothing to link the victim to the executioner. Now, why would a stranger kill a stranger?

Because somebody’s willing to pay. It’s business. Same as any other business. You murder the competition. Instead of price-cutting, throat-cutting. Same thing. There are a lot of people around that would like to see lots of other people die a fast death. Only they can’t see to it themselves. They got conscience, religion, families. They’re afraid of the punishment, here or hereafter. Me, I can’t be bothered with any of that nonsense. I look at it like a good business. The risk is high, but so is the profit.”

Marc – “You’re a real superman, ain’t you?”

Continue reading “Murder by Contract (1958) Hitman Tells You A Stranger Kills A Stranger”