Beach Red (1967) It’s Not Just A War Movie!

Beach Red (1967) - Cornel Wilde World War 2 poster film movie

After being so impressed with director and star Cornel Wilde in magnificent form with his chase movie The Naked Prey I had been excitingly awaiting his 1967 follow up Beach Red. This time he stars as a Captain MacDonald, a leader of a US marine unit sent in to fight the might of the Japanese who have a stronghold on a small island in the Pacific during World War 2.

Beach Red (1967) - Cornel Wilde World War 2 soldier marine battleship

Cornel takes the pacifist anti-war film approach and includes a very everyday man feel to it. You get introduced to the soldiers whilst they are circling around the rough sea onboard their landing craft ready to go into hell as they ready themselves for the beach attack.

It isn’t long before they are given the orders to attack the beach and what transpires is pretty horrific and quite the set piece. For the time, I can imagine this mass beach invasion to have looked very impressive, which it still does. I read and could see clear inspiration to the brutal realism on the D-Day landing sequence in Spielberg’s Saving Private Ryan. It might not have the money and the effects but it’s certainly effective.

Beach Red (1967) - Cornel Wilde World War beach invasion d-day landingBeach Red (1967) - battle on the beach pacific d day landing invasion

What sets this film aside from more gung-ho war films of the time is it’s approach to show a different side to the horrors. Imagery and narration is used in a surreal way to show the morbid reality of war, a cockroach under a boot, a butterfly caught in a spider’s web and the knowledge that most of the insects and plants are out to get you.

We hear little excerpts from each of the marines as inner monologues and daydreams, their fears, worries and feelings for loved ones or even just for everyday chores. Captain MacDonald mutters to himself that he must buy some new glasses when he gets home.

Beach Red (1967) - egan tins of beans cliff
Egan loves his beans.

Also, which is refreshing, is the portrayal of the Japanese soldiers. You see visions of their past lives, like a rice farmer who has been taken away from his wife and young family as he fondly remembers back to his former life.

Beach Red (1967) - battle on the beach pacific japanese soldiers armyBeach Red (1967) - battle on the beach pacific japanese soldiers army 2

Capt MacDonald flashes back to his last encounters with his wife and family whilst Private Egan (Burr DeBenningrecalls his past lady friend hook ups, which leads to a great scene with him drunk as a skunk messing around with a gorgeous leggy lass twice his size. Played by “Tall Girl” Linda Albertano at 6’4″ and damn sexy too.

Beach Red (1967) - leggy tall dancing girl small drunk eganBeach Red (1967) - rip torn Sergeant Honeywell

Total bad ass Sergeant Honeywell played by Rip Torn gets to fire off the films best line.

“”I’m gonna bayonet ’em, break their arms, so they don’t give me no more trouble! That’s what we’re here for… To kill… The rest is all crap!””

Beach Red (1967) - Cornel Wilde in battle

Captain MacDonald gets a good one in too as he tell redneck Private Egan who can’t stop eating tins of beans.

“I’ll put you in for a new medal, Egan…… for abdominal fortitude”

Some of the dialogue and acting is a little rough round the edges but it’s heart is very much in the right place. Well worth tracking it if you haven’t seen it, or if you have, what did you think?

Beach Red (1967) - battle on the beach pacific d day landing invasion fight

Here’s the trailer which is really awesome. It edits pretty much everything in under 3 minutes. I suggest you watch the film first if you gonna see it soon but if you can’t wait, go for it.

Beach Red (1967) - opening film title credits screen shot

The Exterminating Angel (1962) – Sacrificial Lamb Satire

The Exterminating Angel (1962) art poster image film movie

When it comes to movie titles, The Exterminating Angel is pretty spectacular. Being that I only read a small synopsis for the plot I had imagined it would be in the vein of Agatha Christie’sAnd Then There None” and that the exterminating angel was a description of some femme fatale who was unleashing her wrath on the unexpecting party guests. Haha how wrong could I have been!

Luis Buñuel

This, I find out to my complete joy and fascination is a film by Spanish director Luis Buñuel. A true master of surrealism and credited to be one of the most original directors in the history of film medium! Doh I knew the name but had never seen anything by him. Well you have to start somewhere I guess and the beauty is, I now have a whole bunch of his movies to blow my mind and if The Exterminating Angel is anything to go by, I’m in for some real treats.

The Exterminating Angel (1962) house party upper class guests 1

Tagline – The degeneration of high society!

Upper class Edmundo Nóbile and his wife, Lucia invite a bunch of friends and associates back to their luxury mansion for music and late night drinks. As the night continues on into the early hours everyone starts to settle down to sleep on the couches, sofas and even the floor. When morning arrives no one seems keen to leave. Even when they start to feel the need to return to their homes, family or work, they find that once they reach the threshold of the opened doorway they can’t quite bring themselves to walk across it. This predicament carries on and on, causing all manner of countless problems for our guests.

The Exterminating Angel (1962) house party upper class guests 2The Exterminating Angel (1962) house party upper class guests 3

The film is filled with dread, panic and depression, with symbolism and surreal moments aplenty as waves of dreams and delirium take over as food and water runs dry and sleep desperation sets in. Within the horror there is an undercurrent of dark comic humour as these rich aristocracy get brought down a peg or two. What happened and how does it end? Well you have to watch it but Luis Buñuel lets the viewer come up with his own interpretation and it makes the film so much more because of it.

The Exterminating Angel (1962) house party upper class guests water drinking

Luis Buñuel also wrote the screenplay and story which features such fine dialogue and banter lead interactions. Being set in one room I can only imagine it would make the perfect stage play, it’s such a wonderful film and the whole reason I do this blog to find gems like these. One very happy wolfie.

Luis Buñuel quote – Give me two hours a day of activity, and I’ll take the other twenty-two in dreams.

Wake in Fright (1971) – The Greatest Australian Film?

Wake in Fright (1971) poster image dvd vhs film movie

Another month, another bonkers film to add to the list, Wake in Fright from 1971 is essential watching. Marooned in a small town resembling some kind of maddening limbo land, a possible stop off for hell itself . But to be honest this could be just an ordinary Australian outback town going about its everyday life for all that I know.

Think Walkabout meets all of Crocodile Dundee’s mates, add a gazillion gallons of booze and crank that unbearable blistering heat up to maximum overdrive, blast in mountains of dry hot dust and you get a slight picture of what to expect. Who needs water when the beer flows like white rapids at the bottom of a waterfall.

Wake In Fright (1971) beer can crushing Joe (Peter Whittle)

Tagline – Have a drink, mate? Have a fight, mate? Have some dust and sweat, mate? There’s nothing else out here.

On his journey into the mouth of madness is school teacher John Grant (Gary Bond) a young man bored out of his mind determined to escape the sleepy town of Tiboonda. As school breaks for the holiday term John makes a beeline for the train station to visit his girlfriend in the big city of Sydney.

Wake in Fright (1971) Tiboonda train station platform

Fun Fact 1 – John Grant sounds exactly like comic actor Matt Berry‘s characters like Bainbridge from the Mighty Boosh and Dr. Lucien Sanchez from Garth Marenghi’s Darkplace. Big smile from me every time he spoke.

Unfortunately for our man John his train connection brings him to the town of Bundanyabba otherwise known as the Yabba by the locals. A surreal place where there is one main religion, the religion of booze. Promoting the most booze to ever be consumed on film I can only imagine.

Wake In Fright (1971) Jock Crawford (Chips Rafferty) John Grant (Gary Bond)Wake In Fright (1971) gambling John Grant (Gary Bond)

Cop Jock Crawford – “another beer”

John meets a series of characters on his adventure from the friendly but pushy policeman, Jock Crawford (Chips Rafferty) to the kind Tim Hynes (Al Thomas) and his slightly strange daughter Janette Hynes (Sylvia Kay). Then there’s the nutcracker town doctor Doc Tydon (Donald Pleasence) to the bullish introduction to Joe (Peter Whittle) and Dick (Jack Thompson). Everyone puts in a stellar performance and everyone grabs your full attention throughout.

Wake In Fright (1971) Tim Hynes (Al Thomas) John Grant (Gary Bond)

John Grant – “And what do you do?” Doc Tydon – “I drink.”

So many of the set pieces have you transfixed with fear or wide eyed fascination as you watch, especially the gambling sequence where you become as intoxicated in those flying marked coins as the obsessed men playing it. You just can’t help but be mesmerised by John Grant’s journey as he tries to leave the town.

Wake In Fright (1971) Donald Pleasence mad doctor outback

This is truly an Australian masterpiece. A story adapted from a 1961 novel by Kenneth Cook and directed by Canadian Ted Kotcheff the guy who unleashed Rambo on us in 1982 with First Blood.

The history of the film is a mammoth journey in on itself, as lost prints of the film were found at the eleventh hour in a box marked to be destroyed. I read that the films editor Anthony Buckley took it on himself to find the original prints which took on a ten year voyage of discovery.

Wake In Fright (1971) Dick (Jack Thompson)

Please be warned the kangaroo hunting section is barbaric and extremely unpleasant. It’s very tough to watch, so be wary if you watch it. The footage is said to be done by licensed hunters but whatever way you look at it, it is very shocking.

A producer’s’ note at the end of the film states – The hunting scenes depicted in this film were taken during an actual kangaroo hunt by professional licensed hunters. For this reason and because the survival of the Australian kangaroo is seriously threatened, these scenes were shown uncut after consultation with the leading animal welfare organisations in Australia and the United Kingdom

Wake in Fright (1971) booze party time

If you love this then I thoroughly recommend Sunday Too Far Away which has a similar theme, well, of drinking shit loads of booze in the outback but with added sheep.

Fun Fact 2 – It’s currently being made into a 2 part mini series with Wake In Fright (2017) in post-production at the time of posting. To be honest there really isn’t any need to remake it as it’s perfect.

Wake In Fright (1971) Donald Pleasence mad doctor drinking again

If like me and you love Australian cinema then I highly recommend you becoming a “Yabbaman” and getting on this trip if you’ve not seen it.  But if you have, what did you think?

Grab a case of the grog, put another shrimp on the barbie, sit back and enjoy the ride. Watching films don’t get much better. Here’s the trailer for a little peek. Take it easy and drink sensibly hehe … Mikey Wolfie

Further Reading Links

Wake In Fright (1971) New Yorker Article
Wake In Fright (1971) Making Of Notes Guardian Article
Wake In Fright (1971) Wikipedia

Shock Corridor (1963) – Loony Bin Detective

Shock Corridor (1963) - poster image samuel fuller film movie

Oh what a top buzz indeed. I just seen a film that sits perfectly to the feeling I had when I first watched John Frankenheimer’s 1966 thriller with Rock Hudson, the quite brilliant Seconds. That same feeling of watching something really special and highly original for the time. Damn man, Shock Corridor hit all the right notes for me.

“Those whom the gods wish to destroy they first make mad”

Shock Corridor (1963) - Johnny Barrett peter breck

This is the story of an overzealous newspaper journalist called Johnny Barrett (Peter Breck) who is determined to win the Pulitzer Prize for the ultimate story. His mission is to get committed to a mental hospital and work from the inside to solve a murder with the hope of discovering information from three witnesses.

Shock Corridor (1963) - Constance Towers cathy exotic dancer

First though he has to get in the insane asylum. With the help of a professional psychiatrist and his newspaper boss they come up with the crazy notion to get Johnny’s girlfriend, beautiful exotic dancer Cathy (Constance Towers) to pretend to be his sister and to report her “brother” for his incestous advances. Within no time, our hero happily gets what he wants!

Shock Corridor (1963) - Constance Towers cathy exotic dancer worrying

Cathy – “Johnny, you’ve gotta’ be crazy to want to be committed to an insane asylum to solve a murder.”

Set up sounding like a classic B-movie with taglines like “Opens The Doors To Sights You’ve Never Seen Before” to “Recommended for Adults Only!” and to gets those bums on seats, the pull of “Shocking World of Psychos and Sex-Maddened Women Exposed!” but in reality this movie is an all star A class thriller.

Shock Corridor (1963) - inmate insane mental hospital corridor scene

Directed, written and produced by Samuel Fuller.  The script is outstanding, the edits, overlapping images and the lush black and white print are all sublime. The “street” might be just a corridor but it’s extended look just makes it look menacing. The interviews with the three inmate witnesses are so compelling when they hit a spot of awareness and it’s conveyed in image form, so creative.  Plus the fight or getting dragged off scenes are so extremely realistic.

Shock Corridor (1963) - inmate insane mental hospital

Plus did I say it has Nymphos!

Wilkes – “I used to work in the Female Wing. But the “Nympho Ward” got too dangerous for me.”

Shock Corridor (1963) - Nymphos

Johnny – “Nymphos!”

Johnny – “Last time I went into a secret room I was attacked by Amazons!” Wilkes – “Ha That’s a dream most men have.”

Shock Corridor (1963) - Constance Towers peter breck madness

Can our Johnny escape the nymphos, find a knife and fork or decipher the nonsense to get that perfect story and achieve the ultimate prize whilst holding on to his own sanity. Tune in to find out, you won’t be disappointed. This here Wolfie absolutely loved it.

Shock Corridor (1963) - dinner time inmates asylum

Fun Fact – Samuel Fuller became a journalist at an insane young age working as a crime reporter at 17 for the New York Evening Graphic.

Shock Corridor (1963) - New York Evening Graphic random page

Further Reading Links

Shock Corridor (1963) IMDB

Shock Corridor (1963) WIKI

Shock Corridor (1963) Criterion

Mickey One (1965) – Free Jazz New Wave

Mickey One (1965) - Poster

Within five minutes of Mickey One, this experimental film levellies a barrage of outstanding cool black and white images at you. Everyone you could instantly freeze frame, print and stick straight up on your wall.

Mickey One (1965) - sauna steam room scene

This film is surreal, bizarre and super fantastique! Inspired by French New Wave Cinema of the time, Director Arthur Penn (Bonnie And Clyde, Night Moves) goes to town with Alan Surgal script. Twisting together an edgy free falling story into the world of paranoia and fear.

Mickey One (1965) - warren beatty stand up comedianMickey One (1965) - sexy swimming girl

Our handsome wise talking hero is played with passion by a young Warren Beatty. A stand-up comic working the club scene unfortunately run by the Mafia. After a extremely heavy night on the tiles, drinking, partying, gambling and probably flirting with mob bosses girls, or maybe worse, he wakes to realise he has got himself dug way too deep, owing thousands. Fearing for his life he makes a run for it, fleeing to Chicago to hide out. On the road he obtains a Social Security card and becomes Mickey One.

Mickey One (1965) - warren beatty stand up comedian dive club

Mickey One – I’m the king of the silent pictures. I’m hiding out till the talkies blow over. Will you leave me alone?

Mickey One (1965) - jazz dancing drummer girl

Mickey is a twitchy fellow with big anger issues but also buckets of charm and finesse as he tries to make ends meet. He starts to feel his calling back to the stand-up circuit, which brings unwanted attention to the fear laden guy and drives him a little nuts. Lucky he has an agent called George Berson (Teddy Hart) and the gawd darn sexy Jenny Drayton (Alexandra Stewart) to look out for him. Can our Mickey get his feet back on the ground and get this unfortunate mess sorted out?

Mickey One (1965) - fading editing fire slums warren beattyMickey One (1965) - trampoline scene

This film hits so many surreal moments. From trampolines, to saunas, to random people dressed in strange clothes and a massive brawl featuring a load of heavies in pantomime costumes. It’s all strange and fascinating.

Mickey One (1965) - random artist japanese guy

Random jump cuts, fading in and out images, stylised scenes to a few comical segues. None more so than the rag and bone japanese artist guy (Kamatari Fujiwara) who pops up throughout the film just waving at Mickey. He goes off to build one of the craziests art installations you did ever see, just called “Yes”. Does it represent our hero’s predicament? Self destruction…..

Mickey One (1965) - chicago seedy street scenes

And to finish you get the free jazz, spasmodic moods and improvisation from saxophone legend Stan Getz, literally freaking out on his horn giving the scenes an added edge of delirious madness. The Mickey One soundtrack LP is composed by Eddie Sauter and released on MGM Records.

Mickey One (1965) - Record cover LP

Definitely a recommended watch if you can track it down, it’s quite the original piece of filmmaking and carried well by Warren Beatty’s quirky performance. Have you seen it before? What did you think. Let the old Wolfman know. Have fun, enjoy cinema…

Further Reading Links

Mickey One (1965) IMDB

The Long Day’s Dying (1968) Telepathic Pacifist?

The Long Day's Dying (1968) - titles credits david hemmings

The Long Day’s Dying was my favorite film from my March movies watching and the second, that month to feature that man David Hemmings. The other was the excellent school drama, Unman, Wittering and Zigo.

Directed by Peter Collinson, who sandwiched this film in between Up The Junction and the classic mini gold robbing caper The Italian Job.

The Long Day's Dying (1968) - soldiers british film
Not sure on Hemmings kill face!

Starring Mr Hemmings as John, one of three soldiers holed up in a European countryside in a broken down chateau during the second world war. Bombs blast around them, Germans soldiers litter the area. Do they wait for their Sergeant who has ventured out in an attempt to locate their unit, or do they move on before they are discovered?

The Long Day's Dying (1968) - David Hemmings keeping look out

In the spooky house in the woods with a chicken, John, Cliff (Tony Beckley) and Tom Cooper (Tom Bell) talk to each other telepathically and I assure you it’s not an episode of Sapphire and Steel. Well they don’t actually speak with their minds but you hear their inner monologue and they answer each other. It’s gives this World War Two movie a wonderful sense of the surreal. I believe it’s because they are a close unit, brothers in arms, they know what each other’s thoughts and movements are. It’s a intriguing part of this relatively unknown obscure gem, main reason for never being released on VHS or DVD.  Bizarrely it’s on Amazon to rent though.

The Long Day's Dying (1968) - David Hemmings gun soldier

John “I have a small skewer hidden in the collar of my jumping jacket, and a razor blade in my Gaiter as well as my knife”

The three are quite different characters, John keeps going on about being a pacifist as he informs you how well he’s tooled up and gets ready to go in for the kill. Cliff has some big anger problems and takes them out on our feathered friend. And Tom Cooper is a well mannered and thoughtful soldier and a close friend of John’s.  Could a German soldier called Helmet (Alan Dobie) change things for them?

The Long Day's Dying (1968) - capture

Film critic Renata Adler gives the movie a right smashing back on it’s original release of 1968 for The New York Times. The Long Days Dying NY Times Review

I’m not sure if it was because of that review but I see on the promotional poster there’s a long piece saying don’t listen to the bad reviews the film has got.  Written by another New York Times film critic called Penelope Gilliatt, she is English by the way. Here’s what she says, some tough words.

“A very fine piece of writing, acting and filmmaking and I believe that anyone who drags his feet because of the current rumor that the picture is too rough for the American people is making a libellous misjudgement of his country’s mood”

The Long Day's Dying (1968) - explosions

To be fair I can imagine at the time it might of not come off as well. For me it’s the old style that has held up well alongside the writing and those monologues, giving it an original feel which I feel sets it apart from other anti-war films. I was transfixed throughout the runtime and continue to think about it.

Based on a novel by Alan White who was a commando leader during the war so giving it a real authentic realistic feel.

The Long Day's Dying (1968) - David Hemmings novel Alan White

Future Reading Links

The Long Day’s Dying (1968) IMDB

The Long Day’s Dying (1962) Alan White. Goodreads review

The Long Day’s Dying (1968) Amazon UK Rental

La Jetée (1962) Twelve Monkeys Future Past

La Jetée (1962) dvd cover

1995’s Twelve Monkeys is up there in my top 10 science fiction films of all time, somewhere near the very top. Everything about Terry Gilliam’s vision and David Webb’s screenplay is absolute perfection. I knew that it was inspired by a short sci-fi story called La Jetée (The Jetty) by an experimental filmmaker and photographer called Chris Marker but I hadn’t seen it until now!

La Jetée (1962) Glasses

Tagline – “This is the story of a man marked by an image from his childhood.”

This 28 minute film truly blew my mind. Made in 1962 using still photography imagines to tell the story. Some fading in and out over each other, some just stark imagery of pain and madness, framed images showing the bleakness of this tale.

La Jetée (1962) the experiment

This is the story of The Man (Davos Hanich) placed in an experiment of sleep and dreams to return back and forth to the past and future. To find a solution to the bleak dystopian future they are living now. The aftermath of World War III has devastated Paris and the survivors are forced to live underground. Have the scientists found a way to time travel to help with the present. To jump into memories in the subconscious and change the course of the future.

La Jetée (1962) Man and Woman sleep

La Jetée (1962) Man and Woman Chris Marker

The Man returns back and forth to a set memory of The Woman (Hélène Chatelain) a beautiful free spirited young lady. An emotional relationship is realised as he enters his state of mind, feeling and glimpsing moments of time, starting and finishing at an airport viewing platform, The Jetty.

La Jetée (1962) Man and Woman the jetty airport

It’s a devastating poetic experience, with The Narration key to describing the situation to the frozen in time still imagines playing out in black and white photography, all giving to the broken down society and overwhelming pain. Adding to the panic and wonder are whispered voices, German sounding voices and the sound of The Man’s heartbeat as the experiment moves along. But most of all is the breathtaking, devastating music sang by the St. Alexandre Newsky Cathedral Chorus giving a haunting mystical presence to the film.

La Jetée (1962) future people

It’s a true masterpiece and I can image it has been used in essays by directors and film student all around the world for many many years. Right now I need to watch Twelve Monkeys again, sharpish.

Mikey Wolfman says “Have fun, enjoy movies”#

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I try to recreate the experiment. Visions flash in and out, lots of lady wolfs!

Further Reading Links

On La Jetée by Jean-Louis Schefer – Chris Marker Website

Twelve Monkeys (1995)

La Jetée (1962) IMDB

La Jetée (1962) The Criterion Collection

A Boy and His Dog (1975) – Apocalyptic Radar Dogs

A Boy and His Dog (1975) poster

The award for most nut-job movie on my watch list this year so far has to go to the ridiculously controversial but equally brilliant A Boy and His Dog. To be honest I had imagined Brewster McCloud was going to hold on to that title for sometime but no this apocalyptic tale really took the biscuit.

A Boy and His Dog (1975) title opening scene

Tagline – An R rated, rather kinky tale of survival!

Starring a young Don Johnson long before he was living in Miami and had a vice for rolling up his suit jacket sleeves or losing his mind trying to decide if the hot pink shirt should go with aqua blue.

A Boy and His Dog (1975) Vic and Blood
Vic and Blood aka Fuzzy Butt

He plays Vic a fearless young man who has learnt to survive on the barren wastelands of the harsh scorched Earth, scavenging for food and more importantly ladies. The nuclear war has turned everyone into savage nomads, reverted back to basic primeval instincts, violence and sex. Looking a lot like an early Mad Max film and preceding it by four years. Even featuring wacky contraptions for vehicles with added guitar player for car stereo replacement.

A Boy and His Dog (1975) contraptions

Tagline – The year is 2024, a future you’ll probably live to see!

Taking place in a not too far distant future of 2024. The whole of Earth has been destroyed by nuclear war with WW4. The left over human populations has spread itself out over the land in makeshift tents, underground houses and buildings which have been covered over by the bomb blasts. There is also a large civilization that has managed to hole themselves within a large locked down bunker.

A Boy and His Dog (1975) bunker door to underground

Vic’s only buddy is Blood (voiced by Tim McIntire). A lovely looking shaggy dog, who I must add puts in an oscar worthy performance. Now the brilliant thing is Vic and Blood have a telepathic connection. Maybe an after effect from the radiation? I don’t think it was explained but really who cares. Blood’s superb smell acts as a radar tracking down most things in the area especially “screamers” and a much needed lady for his buddy Vic’s “release”.

A Boy and His Dog (1975) strange three men bunker people

The movie is divided up into 3 parts, one on land, one in an underground buried school and the third part within the locked bunker. If you thought the first 2 acts are bonkers, well the last act might amp it up a level. Marching bands, painted faces, a robot and a milking seeding machine!

Blood – Breeding is an ugly thing.

A Boy and His Dog (1975) going into the bunker

It’s also quite strange to find out that it was directed by L Q Jones. A face you would of seen in a thousand westerns and numerous TV series. Not sure if the project was a tough shoot or not but he didn’t direct any more films after it.

A Boy and His Dog L Q Jones

Fun FactL Q Jones real name is the amazing Justice Ellis McQueen, Jr. In fact his first acting role was in a film called Battle Cry (1955) where his character was called L Q Jones and he decided to keep using that throughout his career. Justice McQueen would’ve made a fantastic cowboy name.

A Boy and His Dog (1975) vic and blood fuzzy butt

Fun Fact 2 – Director L Q Jones even gets an uncredited acting part in the film! as an actor in one of the dodgy porno skin flicks being shown at the cinema camp. “A Fistful of Rawhide” hehe.

A Boy and His Dog (1975) wastelands

Jump on in and give this dystopian apocalyptic science fiction movie a go if you fancy something completely different. It’s very un-pc so if you are easily offended I suggest you move on sharpish. If you do watch it i’m sure you will enjoy the total madness of this very original and most excellent film. Full movie on YT here.

Here’s me, Mikey Wolfman with my Boxer dog, Moses. Unfortunately his radar system is now broke!

DSCF5418

Further Reading Links

A Boy and His Dog (1969) Book by Harlan Ellison

A Boy and His Dog (1975) IMDB

A Boy and His Dog (1975) WIKI

Bridges Go Round By Shirley Clarke (1958) Abstract Short Film

Bridges go round 1958 Shirley Clarke blue bridge

Abstract montage of New York bridges to the sound of freeform jazz or electronic magnetic soundscapes? Which one is best? There’s only one way to find out! FIIIGGHHT!

This creative and experimental film Bridges-Go-Round was made by independent filmmaker Shirley Clarke in 1958. What looks like an 8 minute short film is in fact the same 4 min film played twice but with different soundtracks.

Bridges go round 1958 Shirley Clarke director
Director Shirley Clarke

Composer and music producer, Teo Macero supplies the fresh and moody jazz soundtrack for the first run of the film. The music has added voices, which gives a sense of eerie populated movement within the city, even though no human beings are seen. This all adds to a very science fiction feel. A futurist look at a city, many years ahead of 1958.

The second part pushes that feeling further and gives the bridges an out of this world surreal feel, maybe we aren’t on this world at all, a far away planet with electronic music constructed by possible aliens, Bebe and Louis Barron. Pioneers of electronic music, they were light years ahead with their sounds and had only a few years earlier composed the soundtrack for the science fiction classic Forbidden Planet (1956).

Bridges go round 1958 Shirley Clarke

The use of these differing musical styles and Shirley Clarke’s imaginative experiments in mixing the architecture of bridges and skyline structures is truly creative and conveys a different feel and mood. The movement and colour changes reflecting the grand scale of the metal frameworks of mass steel and iron is very impressive.

Bridges go round 1958 Shirley Clarke blue

The descriptions are just my thoughts, everyone is likely to get a different feel from their viewing.  I had to call it a draw between the two, I just can’t pick a favourite. Have a watch below and see what you think…… Mikey the Wolfman

Further Reading Links

Shirley Clarke Director

Composer Teo Macero

Electronic Composers Bebe And Louis Barron

Doodlebug (1997)

doodlebug-nolan-short-film

Here’s is one of Christopher Nolan’s first short films called Doodlebug from 1997 which clocks in at an epic three minutes, well actually it’s a little under. But the director still manages to throw enough crazy ass shit at the screen in this super low budget film. Paranoia, panic, frustration and obsession and even a Twilight Zone twist in it’s ridiculous short run time. It’s really very good.

Starring Jeremy Theobald, this feels like a nice little warm up to the debut film, the dark and intriguing film noir 1998 film Following where the actor and director would work together again. Very recommended film if you haven’t seen it before.

Great to see where directors start to develop their skills. From humble beginnings to the crazy mega bucks in blockbusters. Like the up and coming World War II film I really can’t wait to see on the big screen in July this year, Dunkirk. That surely is going to be epic.  Like all his films you just know they are gonna be intelligent well thought out pieces of art.

Here’s Doodlebug. Enjoy

Nice to see his brother Jonathan credited as grip! He only went on and made probably my most favorite series ever, well along with Noah Hawley’s Fargo, the remake of my beloved 1973 Yul Brynner malfunctioning robot film the classic Westworld.

The brothers make such an incredible team.

Watch out for that shoe! Mikey Wolfman

PS – If you like this then your like this too Room 8