The Informers (1963) Underworld Gangsters, Snitches And Inspector Nigel Patrick

The Informers (1963) incredible drwn artwork poster one sheet Nigel Patrick

Yes I may be of a rotund nature but I’m sure the ladies liked my cuddly frame. Happy go lucky was my motto. Besides, I was a self employed man happy to wander around the good old bars of London supping on whatever booze flowed it’s way into my mouth. A beer always followed a whiskey very nicely. And quite frankly when the whiskey dried up there was always brandy, gin or even a sherry. To be honest I wasn’t fussy. If I was in the pub I could go to work. Me, Irish Jimmy Ruskin (John Cowley) liked to gather information. Observe everything that was happening around me. This knowledge had a price and that price paid for this here nice lifestyle of mine. I wasn’t made for lifting, grafting or labouring. My specialty was collecting crime intelligence and passing it on to my good friend, John. It just so happened that John was otherwise known as Chief Inspector John Edward Johnnoe (Nigel Patrick). Continue reading

Cry Danger (1951) Russian Roulette, A Sexy Pickpocket & A Drunk Wooden Legged Man In A Trailer Park

Cry Danger (1951) Dick Powell Rhonda Fleming film noir drama

Another adventure into the wonderful world of Film Noir brings me to an actor I hadn’t seen before, Dick Powell. Even though I know he’s in the much praised Murder, My Sweet, I’m still to see that. So with that one and another called Pitfall lined up to thrill and excite me soon, my first encounter with Mr Powell is this one, Cry Danger, and it’s a real doozy.

Tagline – Powell’s on the Prowl!

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Side Street (1950) Temptation Brings Pain And Misery!

Side Street (1950) poster art movie noir film mann

Captain Walter Anderson – “New York City, an architectural jungle where fabulous wealth and the deepest squalor live side by side. New York, the busiest, the loneliest, the kindest, and the cruelest of cities. Three hundred and eighty new citizens are being born today in the city. One hundred and ninety-two persons will die. Twelve persons will die violent deaths. And at least one of them will be a victim of murder. A murder a day, every day of the year, and each murder will wind up on my desk.”

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