36 Hours (1964) James Garner WW2 Nazi Mind Control For D-Day Info

One of the biggest secrets of 1944 was the creation of a planned full assault invasion of German occupied Western Europe. An operation that would include hundreds of thousands of troops. To strike a hammer blow against the axis of evil that was Adolf Hitler and his Nazi forces. The 5th of June was put a side for D-Day the top secret Normandy landings and the beginning of the invasion. This enormously important mission would go under the code-name Operation Overlord. Five coastal strike points had been calculated to achieve such a gargantuan undertaking. America was assigned to land at sectors code-named Utah and Omaha, the British at Sword and Gold, and the Canadians at Juno. A task so immense that it needed the utmost secrecy to accomplish. A map was designed for the planning room to coordinate the operations. This map and the mission’s secrecy were of the highest top level importance.

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Decision Before Dawn (1951) WW2 German POW Spying For The Allies

What could possibly be the motivation to spy on your own country? Captured by the enemy. Resigned to the fact that your country is most certainly losing the war. What would make you decide treason is an option against your homeland? To help give your foe the upper hand. This was a dilemma given to a collection of German prisoners of war during World War Two. To cross back onto your battered boarders to retrieve valuable information for the Allied invasion. An unspeakable betrayal!

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The Way Ahead (1944) WWII Blogathon. Propaganda From The Pen Of Peter Ustinov Released on D-Day

The Way Ahead (1944) David Niven carol reed ww2 film poster

There I was enjoying The Way Ahead when the film lands in Algeria with our cast poised ready to join the fighting in North Africa. Raging in the distance, not too far away, is the flash and sounds of heavy gun fire. Fierce battles are taking place as the Allies smash horns with the infamous Rommel and his Afrika Korps. Ordered to wait out the fighting until needed, these British infantry men sit anxiously with the Algerian locals. Waiting inside a small cafe they entertained themselves with songs and darts. Standing grumpy, not at all happy with this invasion on his nice quiet business is a Frenchman called Rispoli. Now I’m looking at him rather baffled. I was convinced he looked like a young Peter Ustinov. And of course it was. He’s quite an unique looking fellow, even in his youth. When the film finished I couldn’t wait to read about his involvement in The Way Ahead and found out a whole lot more. Continue reading

The Way to the Stars (1945) Johnny In The Clouds WWII Bomber Base Drama

The Way to the Stars (1945) Johnny In The Clouds poster film movie anthony asquith

Called The Way to the Stars in the UK and Johnny in the Clouds in the USA. This outstanding World War Two drama focuses on the lives of RAF bomber pilots during the course of the war. It shows the progression of new and improved aircraft being tested and flown into battle. Whilst following the day to day routine of the pilots responsible for flying them awaiting their next mission. Moving through the years of 1940 to 1944. It was released in the UK in June 1945 a few months before WWII had finished and overseas in the US during November. Continue reading

King Rat (1965) Kentucky Fried Rat In Mi Prison What Am I Gonna Do?

King Rat (1965) George Segal Bryan Forbes James Fox POW movie poster

“This is not a story of escape. It is a story of survival. It is set in Changi Jail Singapore, in 1945. The Japanese did not have to guard Changi as a normal prisoner of war camp. The inmates of Changi had no friendly Swiss border or any other neutral country within reach. They were held captive not so much by high walls, or barbed wire, or machine-gun posts, but by the land and sea around them – and the jungle was not neutral, nor was the ocean. They did not live in Changi. They existed. This is the story of that existence.”

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Hannibal Brooks (1969) Ollie The Elephant Goes On World War 2 Road Trip

Hannibal Brooks (1969) oliver reed michael winner lucy the elephant michael j pollard

I love the way Oliver Reed can go from the pure brute force anger filled badboy roles to lighthearted comedic sweet roles, Hannibal Brooks is by far the latter. Ollie plays reluctant soldier, Stephen ‘Hannibal’ Brooks, a captured prisoner of war,  imprisoned at the Stalag VII-A camp near Munich. Brooks gets the chance to help out at the local zoo, feeding and shuffling poo, giant poo at that. The bringer of said big poo is Lucy the Elephant (Aida). Brooks is shocked by the sight of Lucy but it’s not long before the two become great friends. Lucy quickly warms to Brook’s sweet, calming nature and obeys every word he says. It’s not long before these two friends will be spending a lot of quality time together.

Hannibal Brooks (1969) oliver reed the elephant world war 2

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Yesterday’s Enemy (1959) Val Guest, Stanley Baker And Rumpole Of The Bailey

Yesterday's Enemy (1959) val guest world war 2 movie poster stanley baker

Val Guest just impresses every time as I work my way through his varied directed filmography. Enjoying picking around the vast collection of stories he has tackled in his long career. Making sure I hit all the goodies first before I contemplate watching some of the less desirable sounding ones like, well Toomorrow? Also fun fact, can you believe it was Val who started off the cheesy sex comedy series Confessions of a Window Cleaner. Luckily he only made the first one, though he had ventured into saucy land a few years earlier with a slightly naughty one called Au Pair Girls. Continue reading

Orders to Kill (1958) To Assassinate A French Resistance Fighter!

Orders to Kill (1958) Anthony asquith eddie albert paul massie WWII war movie poster

After watching the first-rate drama The Browning Version I investigated other films directed by Anthony Asquith. With a keen interest in World War II history, his 1958 film Orders To Kill, based on a former American intelligence operative called Donald Chase Downes novel, it ticked all the right boxes for me.

Opening credits – “The central story on which this film is based is true!”

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